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October 24, 2011 0

Everyone is talking about the recession and now it looks like we’re entering a double dip. Stock markets are down, petrol prices are up, global unemployment figures are higher than ever before and everything is feeling pretty bleak. But are we making it worse?

Many financial analysts believe that although we cannot talk ourselves into a recession directly, our media coverage and social opinions still have an impact on economic growth. With much of our media suggesting that the glass is always half empty, are we talking ourselves into the recession with our negative thinking and down-hearted press stories?

One expert from a Manchester insolvency practitioners said, “We can talk ourselves into things. Media hype and intensified stories about our recession make us react in a certain way, conning ourselves into believing the recession is here when actually the glass for some people is still half full. We all are emotional beings and negative press stories provoke negative reactions, making us behave as if the recession is already here.”

Historians say that the same was true in the times of the Wall Street Crash. It “happened for the public” before it “actually even happened.”

Actually, there are some good things going on in our economy which the press do not talk about, generally because negative stories make for better reading material.

For example, the Government are taking hold of the debt crisis and although they are making cuts, this is for the greater good of the country and the deficit situation. Exports are doing well, the agricultural industry is also booming. More and more of our students are getting into universities, many people are recycling in more ways than ever before, and although unemployment figures are high, new courses and vocational training programmes are being introduced as a way of getting people back into work. There is definitely hope on the horizon, but the press tend to favour the negative stories over these more positive ones.

So how can we stop it?

By thinking and behaving more positively, and not believing all you read at face value, is a good place to start.

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